Blog


LIRNEasia is hiring: Researcher wanted

Posted on December 6, 2019  /  0 Comments

We are currently looking to fill the role of a Researcher. The full job description is available here. The deadline for application is  20th December 2019. 
Recollections and reflections from an in-depth interview with a hearing-disabled person in Buttala, Sri Lanka
Presented by Prof. Rohan Samarajiva at SLAAS / SLIC Conference "From Innovation to Impact" 2019 on 22nd November 2019. Colombo, Sri Lanka
The group is an expansion of the UN Global Pulse Data Privacy Advisory Group which was established in 2014, and of which Samarajiva was a member since inception.
CEO Helani Galpaya was invited to speak at the "Asian Liveable Cities Forum: Digital Solutions for Livable Cities" conference held in San Francisco, 12-14 November 2019
What one man's daily commute can tell us about the benefits and discomforts of disclosing one's disability

Remembering Deunden Nikomborirak

Posted on November 2, 2019  /  2 Comments

What does one say about the passing of Deunden Nikomborirak?  How does one adequately mourn the death of one so accomplished, one with so much more to give?  What does one say about a death too early? I recalled our last lunch together, several years ago.  Too many.
When faced with complex issues, education issues, for example, it is tempting to come up with a hundred and one things one might do to fix. That is a mistake. Unless we identify a few pivotal changes that will lead to positive repercussions across the education sector, we will be lost in detail.
Presented by Ayesha Zainudeen and Tharaka Amarasinghe at the 15th ITS Asia-Pacific Regional Conference Bangkok, Thailand, 29 October 2019 The full paper is available here.
Presented by Ayesha Zainudeen and Tharaka Amarasinghe at the 15th ITS Asia-Pacific Regional Conference Bangkok, Thailand, 29 October 2019 The slides presented are available here.

2018-2019 Annual Report

Posted by Namali Premawardhana on October 3, 2019  /  0 Comments

LIRNEasia's Annual Report of Activities during the financial year to March 2019.
Helani Galpaya 24 Sep 2019 | CEPA Open Forum | Colombo, Sri Lanka

A Socioeconomic Index for Sri Lanka

Posted on September 20, 2019  /  0 Comments

A socioeconomic index, also known as a deprivation or poverty index, is a single numerical figure derived from multiple indicators, that gauges the socioeconomic status of a predefined area. It allows for direct comparisons of socioeconomic status between regions and is tremendously useful in identifying patterns and correlations between socioeconomic status and other attributes. However, it is not easy to construct as there are many indicators to choose from – income, expenditure, education, occupation, durable assets, etc. and it is difficult to objectively justify their relative importance. Several governments and organisations have developed socioeconomic indices for their respective regions that have been widely accepted as official: The National Statistics Socio-Economic Classification (NS-SEC) for the United Kingdom The European Deprivation Index (EDI) for Europe The Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA) for Australia The New Zealand Deprivation Index (NZDep) for New Zealand The Global Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) Unfortunately, Sri Lanka does not yet have such an index.
The draft National Digital Policy proposes a target of 70% of internet users by 2025, an undeniably ambitious target. The target – pulled out of thin air as though it may seem – is actually based on a time series forecast using ITU statistics from 2000-2017. The forecast was computed using a statistical software called Tableau, which considers exponential smoothing and seasonality. The lower and upper levels were based on 95% confidence intervals. The chart below shows that the upper limit that can be achieved is 74% by 2025 if accelerated efforts are made to drive internet adoption and smartphone use in Sri Lanka.
E-Resilience is a system property but poorly understood in Asia and the Pacific because it is understood almost exclusively in terms of continuity and recovery; the “bounce forward” adaptive role of E-Resilience remains uninvestigated doesn’t Included the fundamental enablers of E-Resilience, which are robustness, self-organization, and learning hasn’t fully employed diagnose and remediation programs to bounce forward; thus, ensuring improving telecom survivability/availability, rapid restoration of access to telecoms, real-time data services, dedicated public security networks, and proven business continuity and disaster recovery plans and procedures. VIEW SLIDES – “e-Resilience in support of emergency communication: best-practices.” These facts are worth considering for steering the AP-IS E-Resilience initiatives. As shown in Figure 1, resilience should elevate each additional state above the previous (initial) state. Nevertheless, I’m very excited to see UN-ESCAP AP-IS initiative taking two and half of the recommendations presented in the previous year; i.
Presentation on e-Resilience in support of Emergency Communications: best-practices; – 3nd session of the AP-IS steering committee and WSIS regional review meeting held 26th & 29th August 2019, UN Conference Center in Thailand. The event was part of the UN-ESCAP Disaster Resilience Week. Slides: waidyanatha_e-resilience(session5)_LIRNEasia